Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
You are here: Home People Larry Gorenflo

Larry Gorenflo

Larry Gorenflo

Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture

Stuckeman School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

122 Stuckeman Family Building
University Park , PA 16802
Email:
Office Phone: (814) 865-9511

Education:

  1. B.A. Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University (Highest Distinction), 1979
  2. M.A. Anthropology, The University of Michigan, 1981
  3. Ph.D. Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1985

Biography:

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

I have advanced degrees in geography and anthropology, combining conceptual understanding of past and present cultural adaptation with strong analytical capabilities. My research interests extend beyond anthropology and archaeology, but include the evolution of complex societies through the study of archaeological settlement pattern data, historical demography, and land use, primarily in central Mexico. I maintain a focus rooted primarily in ecological anthropology, exploring how past and present cultures adapted to the natural and cultural environments around them, and how they in turn affected those environments. My field experience includes archaeological research in more than a dozen states, and archaeological or anthropological research in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, North America, Oceania, and South America.

Topics of general interest include food production, regional organization, and environmental impacts. My methodological interests include geographic information systems, agent-based modeling, and statistics.

FIELDWORK:

I have conducted anthropological and geographical fieldwork for more than 30 years. My archaeological research focuses in the Basin of Mexico, where I am completing the final phase of settlement database development for three survey regions, finalizing an evaluation of the condition of the prehispanic settlement record in the Basin (in collaboration with Jeff Parsons), exploring the interrelationship between settlement based at Teotihuacan and that occurring elsewhere in the Basin (with Ian Robertson), and exploring planning options for the conservation of ancient Teotihuacan (also with Ian Robertson. Additional research interests in the Basin of Mexico include exploring the role of irrigation in the evolution of complex societies in the Basin (with Ian Robertson) and the study of historic land use through analysis of aerial photography and historical demography (with Jeff Parsons). I also currently direct or co-direct projects in Tanzania (human adaptation and community design in the vicinity of Udzungwa Mountains National Park), Cambodia (rural economies and community mapping in the Cardamom Mountains Protected Forest), and New Mexico (community design for environmental and cultural sustainability).

COURSES TAUGHT:Recent Journal and Book Chapter Publications related to Archaeology

LArch 311 -   Landscape Systems Studio
LArch 321  -  Landscape Systems Seminar
LArch 414.x  -  Conservation Planning
LArch 424  -  Water for People and Nature Seminar
LArch 499E  -  Community Design for Conservation in the Vicinity of Udzungwa Mountains National Park Studio
LArch 499F -   Community Design for Conservation in the Vicinity of Udzungwa Mountains National Park Seminar
LArch 510  -  Cultural Ecology Seminar

Recent Journal and Book Chapter Publications related to Archaeology:

n.d.

Prehispanic Settlement Data and Analysis in the Basin of Mexico. To submit to Ancient Mesoamerica, December 2010.

Taking Stock of Basin of Mexico Archaeology in 2007. To submit to Ancient Mesoamerica, December 2010 (Ian Robertson and L.J. Gorenflo).

2010

Why is Aztec II Black-on-Orange Pottery so Scarce in the Zumpango Region? A Regional Perspective from the Basin of Mexico on Tula’s Collapse and its Aftermath. In A. Martinez, L. Martos, and R. Cobean (eds.) Homenaje a Alba Guadalupe Mastache Flores. Mexico City: Instituto Nacional de Anthropología e Historia (forthcoming, Jeffrey Parsons and L.J. Gorenflo).

2008

The Patterning of Settlement. In J.R. Parsons (ed.) Prehispanic Settlement Patterns in the Northwestern Valley of Mexico: The Zumpango Region, pp. 61-99. Memoir 45, The University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor (Jeffrey Parsons and L.J. Gorenflo).

2006

The Evolution of Regional Demography and Settlement in the Prehispanic Basin of Mexico.  In G.R. Storey (ed.), Population and Preindustrial Cities: A Cross-Cultural Perspective, pp. 295-314.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

2000

The Temascalapa Region: Aztec Period Site Descriptions. In W.T. Sanders and S.T. Evans (Eds.), The Teotihuacan Valley Project Final Report - Volume 5: The Aztec Period Occupation of the Valley, Part 2, Excavations at TA-40 and Related Projects, pp. 575-686. University Park, PA: Occasional Papers in Anthropology 19, Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University (L.J. Gorenflo and William Sanders).

Recently Published Monographs on Archaeology:

2011

Prehispanic Settlement Patterns in the Temascalapa Region, Mexico. Occasional Papers in Anthropology, Number 31, Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University (forthcoming, L.J. Gorenflo and William T. Sanders).

2007

Archaeological Settlement Pattern Data from the Cuautitlan, Temascalapa, and Teotihuacan Regions, Mexico. Occasional Papers in Anthropology, Number 30, Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University (L.J. Gorenflo and William T. Sanders).

Prehispanic Settlement Patterns in the Cuautitlan Region, Mexico. Occasional Papers in Anthropology, Number 29, Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University (William T. Sanders and L.J. Gorenflo).

Personal tools
Log in